Cliches

One of the most widespread European beliefs regarding United States is the illiteracy of its people. It strikes me, especially when shown in a country (Spain) which has its own periodic share of educative humiliation in the way of Pisa Reports.
The following video is quite old, but still interesting. It was filmed in a CNN style by the satiric team of the Australian program ‘The Chaser’. Julian Morrow, one of its members, asked some questions to anonimous passers-by in Texas. And this was the result (≈10 min.)…

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QVbobdL3yi0[/youtube]
I am not denying the initial shock that some of the answers provoke, being as horrified by them as many other bloggers that have already expressed their reaction. What I am saying is that this kind of ignorant answers, let’s be honest, can be found in many places of any country of the World.
According to the RAE, cliche is a “common place, idea or expression which is too often repeated or formulated”. Even if disinformation exists to some extent, and must be treated as a problem, maybe U.S. stupidity is one of those cliches and becomes, as any other, a harming one for international journalism.
A new blog, Kill the cliche, analyses international news published by the elite press in order to identify overused terms. Anybody remember “collateral damages” and its serious consequences? It sounds as a new useful tool to become aware of the influence of sanitized expressions and untested thoughts when covering abroad.